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Veterinary Homeopathy branded 'Quackery'

A professor of veterinary pharmacology at the Royal Veterinary College in London has branded homeopathy as 'quackery' after publishing a comprehensive review which compared veterinary drugs with homeopathic ones.
 
Peter Lees was quoted as saying : "If it were proved to be the case that homeopathy actually works by some mysterious mechanism, that would be a discovery on a par with Newton's laws of motion and Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. It would totally rewrite the scientific agenda, but of course it's not going to do that."
 
Prof Lees' article, written in association with other senior colleagues at the RVC, was published in the Veterinary Record. It concludes "Homeopathy appears to be one of many examples from the history of medicine, of therapies, conventional and otherwise, which were thought to be effective, but were later proved to be ineffective or even harmful". 
 
He also commented that in human medicine, homeopathy may well have a 'placebo effect' where the patient convinces himself or herself that a 'treatment' is actually working, but animals did not possess that mental capability.
 
The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons standards committee are formally reviewing their position and guidance regarding complementary and alternative medicines including homeopathy.  They are concerned that using homeopathy remedies has ethical implications if an ineffective, implausible and irrational therapy is used.
 
A statement from the British Associaton of Homeopathic Veterinary Surgeons refuted the conclusions of the study.